Management & Strategy Gurus and Masters

The complete A to Z Guide




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A point of clarification before you start your journey with the gurus and masters: a Guru is a person who is very knowledgeable and teaches a particular strategy. A Master is a practitioner of the art of strategy in life and in business.





Management & Strategy Gurus

Main Guru's Index


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Igor Ansoff

Igor Ansoff The father of Strategic management

Igor Ansoff (1918-July 14, 2002) was an applied mathematician and business manager. He is known as the father of Strategic management.

He was a distinguished professor at United States International University (now Alliant International University) for 17 years, where several institutes continue his work in strategic management research.

Igor was recognized worldwide as the Pioneer and Father of Strategic Management. He was the first management strategy guru to recognize the need for strategic planning for firms operating in the increasingly complex and turbulent environment.



Chris Argyris

Chris Argyris (born July 16, 1923) in Newark, New Jersey, USA, a Professor Emeritus at Harvard Business School, is more commonly known for seminal work in the area of Learning Organizations which was later developed in the best selling The Fifth Discipline by Peter M. Senge.

The work of Chris Argyris has influenced our thinking about the relationship of people and organizations, organizational learning and action research.

Other key concepts developed by Argyris include Ladder of Inference, Double-Loop Learning, Theory of Action/Espoused Theory/Theory-in-use, High Advocacy/High Inquiry dialogue, Actionable Knowledge.



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Christopher Bartlett and Samantha Ghoshal

Christopher Bartlett is the Thomas D. Casserly, Jr. Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration.

Sumantra Ghoshal (1948-2004) was the founding Dean of the Indian School of Business in Hyderabad, which is jointly sponsored by the Kellogg School at North-western University and the London Business School. Ghoshal co-authored Managing Across Borders:

Sumantra Ghoshal and Christopher Bartlett wrote the Transnational Solution, which has been listed in the Financial Times as one of the 50 most influential management books and has been translated into nine languages.



Gary S Becker

Gary Becker's most noteworthy contribution is perhaps to be found in the area of human capital, i.e., human competence, and the consequences of investments in human competence. The theory of human capital is considerably older than Becker's work in this field.

His foremost achievement is to have formulated and formalized the microeconomic foundations of the theory. In doing so, he has developed the human-capital approach into a general theory for determining the distribution of labour income.



G Bennett-Stewart

In his bestselling classic of financial management, G. Bennett Stewart, III, raises and answers these provocative questions:

  • Do dividends matter?
  • Are earnings per share really accurate measures of corporate performance?
  • What is the engine that really drives share prices?

More than that, Stewart lays the foundation for EVar, the financial management and incentive system now in place at nearly 300 companies around the world, and which is rapidly becoming the global standard for corporate governance.



Chester Barnard

Chester Irving Barnard (1886–1961) was a telecommunications executive and author of Functions of the Executive, an influential 20th century management book, in which Barnard presented a theory of organization and the functions of executives in organizations.

He looked at organizations as systems of cooperation of human activity, and was worried about the fact that they are typically rather short-lived.

Firms that last more than a century are rather few, and the only organization that can claim a substantial age is the Catholic Church.

According to Barnard, this happens because organizations do not meet the two criteria necessary for survival: effectiveness and efficiency.



Warren Bennis

Warren Gameliel Bennis (born March 8, 1925) is an American scholar, organizational consultant and author who is widely regarded as a pioneer of the contemporary field of leadership studies.

“His work at MIT in the 1960s on group behaviour foreshadowed -- and helped bring about -- today's headlong plunge into less hierarchical, more democratic and adaptive institutions, private and public,” management expert Tom Peters wrote in 1993 in the foreword to Bennis’ An Invented Life: Reflections on Leadership and Change.



Ken Blanchard

Prior to publishing The One Minute Manager®, Ken Blanchard was already an emerging thought leader due to his years of research and development on the theory of Situational Leadership with Paul Hersey.

Their work was published as early as 1969 as an academic textbook Management of Organizational Behaviour.

By 1981, Ken and co-author Spencer Johnson had self-published The One Minute Manager® and it was on its way to becoming one of the best-selling business books of all time, continuing today to hit the monthly business best seller lists over 25 years later.



W. Chan Kim and Renée Mauborgne

Blue Ocean Strategy

Blue Ocean Strategy is a corporate strategy and bestselling business book written by Professors W. Chan Kim and Renée Mauborgne, of INSEAD.

Blue Ocean Strategy provides a systematic approach to making the competition irrelevant. In this frame-changing book, Kim and Mauborgne present a proven analytical framework and the tools for successfully creating and capturing blue oceans.



Adam Brandenburger

Adam Brandenburger is a professor at the Harvard Business School. He is the author of a number of Harvard's strategy cases and, with Barry Nalebuff, author of the book CO-OPETITION.

His articles about game theory and business strategy have appeared in such publications as Harvard Business Review, Journal of Economics & Management Strategy, Econometrica, and Journal of Economic Theory.



John Seely Brown

John Seely Brown is currently a visiting scholar at USC and prior to that he was the Chief Scientist of Xerox Corporation and the director of its Palo Alto Research Center (PARC)-a position he held for nearly two decades.

While head of PARC, Brown expanded the role of corporate research to include such topics as organizational learning, knowledge management, complex adaptive systems, ethnographic studies of the workscape and nano technology.



Cliff Bowman

Cliff Bowman is a Professor of Strategic Management. After graduating, Cliff joined Shell UK in marketing and sales. He then moved to the UK Civil Aviation Authority as an economist, where he worked in airport planning and airline economics.

He teaches strategy across Cranfield MBA and Executive Programmes. His research has addressed issues of strategy process, top team commitment, competitive strategy and corporate advantage.



Richard Branson (Master)

Sir Richard Charles Nicholas Branson (born 18 July 1950 (1950-07-18) (age 57) in Shamley Green, Surrey, England), is a British entrepreneur, best known for his Virgin brand of over 360 companies.

Branson is a master strategist. His first successful business venture was at age 16, when he published a magazine called Student. He then set up a record mail-order business in 1970. In 1971, he opened a chain of record stores, now known as Virgin Megastores.

With his flamboyant and competitive style, Branson's Virgin brand grew rapidly during the 1980s - as he set up Virgin Atlantic Airways and expanded the Virgin Records music label.

Today, his net worth is estimated at over £4 billion (US$7.8 billion) according to The Sunday Times Rich List 2006, or US$3.8 billion according to Forbes magazine.



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Andrew Carnegie (Master)

Andrew Carnegie (November 25, 1835 – August 11, 1919) was a Scottish industrialist, businessman, a major philanthropist, and the founder of Pittsburgh's Carnegie Steel Company which later became U.S. Steel.

Carnegie the Master Strategist, is known for having built one of the most powerful and influential corporations in United States history, and, later in his life, giving away most of his riches to fund the establishment of many libraries, schools, and universities in America, Scotland and other countries throughout the world.

Carnegie is known to have sponsored Napoleon Hill and coached him in writing the legendary "think and Grow Rich" Book. This book's number of copies sold is second only to the Bible.



Clayton Christensen

Clayton Christensen on Disruptive Innovations

Clayton M. Christensen is The World's Leading Expert On Disruptive Innovation strategies.

He is the Robert and Jane Cizik Professor of Business Administration at the Harvard Business School, with a joint appointment in the Technology & Operations Management and General Management faculty groups.

His research and teaching interests centre on the management issues related to the development and commercialization of technological and business model innovation.



Alfred Chandler

Alfred DuPont Chandler, Jr. (September 15, 1918 –May 9, 2007) was a professor of business history at Harvard Business School, who wrote extensively about the scale and the management structures of modern corporations.

Chandler graduated from Harvard College in 1940. After wartime service in navy, he returned to Harvard to get his Ph.D. in History. He taught at M.I.T. and Johns Hopkins University before arriving at Harvard Business School in 1970.



Ronald Coase

received the Alfred Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences in 1991 for his discovery and clarification of the significance of transaction costs and property rights for the institutional structure and functioning of the economy.

Currently Clifton R. Musser Professor Emeritus of Economics at the University of Chicago Law School.



Stephen Covey (master)

An internationally respected leadership authority, family expert, teacher, organizational consultant, and author, Dr. Covey dedicates his life to teaching principle-centered living and leadership to individuals, families, and organizations.

Holder of an MBA from Harvard and a doctorate degree from Brigham Young University, Dr. Covey is author of the international bestseller, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, named the #1 Most Influential Business Book of the Twentieth Century, and other best sellers that include First Things First , Principle-Centered Leadership, and The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Families.



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Edward De Bono (Master/Guru)

Edward de Bono was born in Malta in 1933. He attended St Edward's College, Malta, during World War II and then the University of Malta where he qualified in medicine.

He holds a PhD from Cambridge and an MD from the University of Malta. He has held appointments at the universities of Oxford, London, Cambridge and Harvard.

Dr Edward de Bono is one of the very few people in history who can be said to have had a major impact on the way we think. In many ways he could be said to be the best known thinker internationally and the creator of the concept of Lateral thinking.



Michael Dell (Master)

Michael Dell, born in February 1965, is the chairman of the Board of Directors and chief executive officer of Dell, the company he founded in 1984 with $1,000 and an unprecedented idea - to build relationships directly with customers. In 1992, Mr. Dell became the youngest CEO ever to earn a ranking on the Fortune 500.

Mr. Dell (Master Strategist) is the author of Direct From Dell: Strategies That Revolutionized an Industry, his story of the rise of the company and the strategies he has refined that apply to all businesses.

Forbes estimates Michael Dell's net worth at $15.8 billion, making him the 30th richest person in the world and the ninth richest American.



W. Edwards Deming

William Edwards Deming (October 14, 1900–December 20, 1993) was an American statistician, college professor, author, lecturer, and consultant.

Deming is widely credited with improving production in the United States during World War II, although he is perhaps best known for his work in Japan.

Deming made a significant contribution to Japan becoming renowned for producing innovative high-quality products and becoming an economic power.

Deming is regarded as having had more impact upon Japanese manufacturing and business than any other individual not of Japanese heritage.



A De Geus

Arie de Geus spent 38 years on three continents as a line manager at Royal Dutch Shell, and finished his career as the Corporate Planning Director in charge of business and scenario planning.

His 1988 Harvard Business Review article, "Planning as Learning", established him as a leading expert in organisational learning. Arie de Geus has been a Visiting Fellow at London Business School and adviser to many governments and private institutions.

In 1997 he published a book entitled "The Living Company: Habits for Survival in a Turbulent Business Environment", which has been translated into more than twenty languages, has been widely praised and has received a number of awards.

In his book, Arie explains why so many companies die early, and provides the key to corporate longevity. When the usual lifespan of a company is 12.5 years, and of a multinational, 40 years, how have some companies survived for centuries. As the former head of strategic planning for Royal Dutch Shell, de Geus knows that the answer is people more than financial assets



Peter Drucker

Peter Drucker the founding father of the study of strategic management

Peter Ferdinand Drucker: born November 19, 1909, Vienna, Austria died November 11, 2005, Claremont, California.

The founding father of the study of management.

Peter Drucker made famous the term knowledge worker and is thought to have unknowingly ushered in the knowledge economy, which effectively challenges Karl Marx's world-view of the political economy. George Orwell credits Peter Drucker as one of the only writers to predict the German-Soviet Pact of 1939.



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Larry Ellison (Master)

Lawrence Joseph Ellison (born August 17, 1944) is the co-founder and CEO of Oracle Corporation, a major database software company.

During the 1970s, Ellison worked for the Ampex Corporation. One of his projects was a database for the CIA, which he named "Oracle," the abstract idea that was dismissed by a University of Chicago professor.

He founded Oracle in 1977, putting up a mere $2000 of his own money, under the name Software Development Laboratories (SDL).

Ellison does not hide the fact that he is a practitioner of Sun Tzu the Art of War Strategy in his business dealings.



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Henry Ford (Master)

Henry Ford (July 30, 1863 – April 7, 1947) was the founder of the Ford Motor Company and father of modern assembly lines used in mass production.

His introduction of the Model T automobile revolutionized transportation and American industry. He was a prolific inventor and was awarded 161 U.S. patents.

As sole owner of the Ford Company, he became one of the richest and best-known people in the world. He is credited with "Fordism", that is, the mass production of large numbers of inexpensive automobiles using the assembly line, which could finish a car in 98 minutes, coupled with high wages for his workers—notably the $5.00 per day pay scale adopted in 1914.

Ford (a master strategist) left most of his vast wealth to the Ford Foundation but arranged for his family to control the company permanently.



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Bill Gates (Master)

William Henry Gates III (born October 28, 1955) is an American entrepreneur, philanthropist and chairman of Microsoft, the software company he founded with Paul Allen.

Gates is one of the best-known strategists and entrepreneurs of the personal computer revolution. Although he is widely admired, his business tactics have been criticized as anti-competitive and in some instances ruled as such in court.

The annual Forbes magazine's list of The World's Billionaires has ranked Gates as the richest person in the world from 1995 to 2007, with recent estimates putting his net worth near $59 billion.



Eliyahu Goldratt

Eliyahu M. Goldratt (1948 - ) is an Israeli physicist turned business consultant, the originator of the Theory of Constraints (abbreviation: TOC).

He claims that he applied the scientific method to resolving some permanent problems of organizations.

He obtained his Bachelor of Science degree from Tel Aviv University and his Masters of Science, and Doctorate of Philosophy from Bar-Ilan University.



Daniel Goleman

Daniel Goleman is an internationally known psychologist who lectures frequently to professional groups, business audiences, and on college campuses.

Working as a science journalist, Goleman reported on the brain and behavioural sciences for The New York Times for many years. His 1995 book, Emotional Intelligence was on The New York Times bestseller list for a year-and-a-half; with more than 5,000,000 copies in print worldwide in 30 languages, and has been a best seller in many countries.



Robert Grant

Robert M. Grant is Professor of Management at Georgetown University and City University, London. He is on the editorial boards of Strategic Management Journal and Strategy and Leadership.

His business experience ranges from producing pork pies (Kraft Foods) and retreading tires (Firestone), to strategy consulting with American Express, ENI and other companies. He is also the editor of Cases in Contemporary Strategy Analysis (Second Edition, Blackwell Publishers, 1999).



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Michael Hammer and James Champy

Michael Martin Hammer and James Champy

Michael Martin Hammer and James Champy are founders of the management theory of Business process reengineering (BPR)

No business concept was more important to America's economic revival in the 1990s than reengineering. Already a classic, this international bestseller pioneered the most important topic in business circles today: reengineering -- the radical redesign of a company's processes, organization, and culture to achieve a quantum leap in performance.



Gary Hamel and C K Prahalad

Gary Hamel and C. K. Prahalad on Core Competency

In 1996, Hamel and Prahalad caution that complacent managers who get too comfortable in doing things the way they have always done will see their companies fall behind.

Gary Hamel and Prahalad write about Core Competency - Those things that define what is special about an organization, what sets it apart from other organizations. Competencies are those things the company or organization does well.

Core competencies are those things that are fundamental to the organization. Without those core competencies, the organization would not be the same organization.



Charles Handy

Charles Handy (born 1932) is an Irish author/philosopher specialising in organisational behaviour and management.

Among the ideas he has advanced are the "portfolio worker" and the "Shamrock Organization" (in which professional core workers, freelance workers and part-time/temporary routine workers each form one leaf of the "Shamrock").

Born the son of an archdeacon in Kildare, Ireland, Handy was educated at Oriel College, Oxford.

In July 2006, he was conferred with an honorary Doctor of Laws by Trinity College, Dublin. He has been rated among the Thinkers 50, the most influential living management thinkers. In 2001, he was second on this list, behind Peter Drucker, and in 2005, he was tenth.

Handy's business career started in marketing at Shell International.

He was a co-founder of the London Business School in 1967 and left Shell to teach there in 1972. When the Harvard Business Review had a special issue to mark their 50th Anniversary, they asked Handy, Peter Drucker and Henry Mintzberg to write special articles.



P Haspeslagh and D Jemison

Philippe Haspeslagh is Associate Professor of Business Policy at INSEAD in Fontainebleau, France, and Director of its Strategic Issues in Mergers and Acquisitions Executive Program.

David Jemison is Associate Professor of Management and Joseph Paschal Dreibelbis Faculty Fellow at the University of Texas at Austin.

This book is based on the authors' research on acquisitions in ten countries as well as their experience as educators and advisors in the area of acquisition management and corporate development in international firms Jemison and Haspeslagh are the high priests of M&A strategy.



Napoleon Hill

Napoleon Hill (October 26, 1883–November 8, 1970) was an American author who was one of the earliest producers of the modern genre of personal-success literature.

His most famous work, Think and Grow Rich, is one of the best-selling books of all time. In America, Hill stated in his writings, people are free to believe what they want to believe, and this is what sets the United States apart from all other countries in the world.

Hill's works examined the power of personal beliefs, and the role they play in personal success.

"What the mind of man can conceive and believe, it can achieve" is one of Hill's hallmark expressions. How achievement actually occurs, and a formula for it that puts success in reach for the average person, were the promise of Hill's books.

Hill called his success teachings "The Philosophy of Achievement" and he considered freedom, democracy, capitalism, and harmony to be important contributing elements.

For without these, Hill demonstrated throughout his writings, personal beliefs are not possible.

He contrasted his philosophy with others, and thought Achievement was superior and responsible for the success Americans enjoyed for the better part of two centuries.

Fear and selfishness had no part to play in his philosophy, and Hill considered them to be the source of failure for unsuccessful people.



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Gerry Johnson and Kevin Scholes

Johnson and Scholes book 'Exploring Corporate Strategy' gives a comprehensive overview of strategic management concepts, techniques and approaches, right through from the analysis, choice and to the implementation phase.

The book also contains extensive case material (which is continually being updated).



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Rosebeth Moss Kanter

Rosabeth Moss Kanter holds the Ernest L. Arbuckle Professorship at Harvard Business School, where she specializes in strategy, innovation, and leadership for change.

Her strategic and practical insights have guided leaders of large and small organizations worldwide for over 25 years, through teaching, writing, and direct consultation to major corporations and governments.

The former Editor of Harvard Business Review (1989-1992), Professor Kanter has been named to lists of the “50 most powerful women in the world” (Times of London), and the “50 most influential business thinkers in the world” (Accenture and Thinkers 50 research).

In 2001, she received the Academy of Management’s Distinguished Career Award for her scholarly contributions to management knowledge, and in 2002 was named “Intelligent Community Visionary of the Year” by the World Teleport Association.



John Kay

Strategy Buzzwords and the Economist John Kay

Shallow lesson of business books by John Kay

John Kay (1948— ) is a Scottish economist. Born in Edinburgh, he was educated at the Royal High School, Edinburgh University and Nuffield College, Oxford.

John Kay is one of Britain’s leading economists. His interests focus on the relationships between economics and business. His career has spanned academic work and think tanks, business schools, company directorships, consultancies and investment companies. For more details of John’s biography, see the About section.

John’s main current interest is in writing and his most important recent book was published in Europe in 2003 as The Truth about Markets and in the US in 2004 as Culture and Prosperity.



Kaplan and Norton

In the realm of business, the concept of Strategy Maps was introduced by Robert S. Kaplan and David P. Norton. The standard reference is the book Strategy Maps by Robert S. Kaplan and David P. Norton.

Kaplan and Norton are credited with developing the Balanced scorecard in 1992. This appeared in a paper in the Harvard Business Review.

The focus of the Balanced Scorecard is to provide organizations with metrics against which to measure their success. The underlying principle was that you couldn’t manage what you cannot measure.



Kevin Kelly

Kevin Kelly helped launch Wired magazine in 1993, and served as its Executive Editor until January 1999. He is now Editor-At-Large for Wired.

From 1984 to 1990 Kelly was publisher and editor of the Whole Earth Review, a journal of unorthodox technical news. Whole Earth was the first consumer magazine to report on virtual reality, ecological restoration, the global teenager, Internet culture and artificial life (to name just a few early trends).

Author of Out of Control: The New Biology of Machines, Economic and Social Systems and New Rules for the New Economy .



Philip Kotler

S.C. Johnson & Son Distinguished Professor of International Marketing at the Northwestern University Kellogg Graduate School of Management in Chicago.

Dr. Kotler has authored what is widely recognized as the best selling textbook on marketing: Marketing Management, now in its 12th edition. He has also authored, or co-authored a number of other books, including Kotler on Marketing; Lateral Marketing; Strategic Marketing for Non-Profits; Marketing for Healthcare Organizations; Marketing Professional Services; Marketing From A to Z; The 10 Deadly Marketing Sins; Marketing Moves; Marketing places; the Marketing of Nations; and Social Marketing.



John Kotter

Harvard Business School Professor John Kotter is widely regarded as the world's foremost authority on leadership and change. His has been the premier voice on how the best organizations actually "do" change.

John Kotter’s international bestseller Leading Change—that outlined an actionable, 8-step process for implementing successful transformations—became the change bible for managers around the world. In October 2001, Business Week magazine rated Kotter the #1 "leadership guru" in America based on a survey they conducted of 504 enterprises.

His newest work released September 2006, Our Iceberg Is Melting, puts the 8-step process within an allegory, making it accessible to the broad range of people needed to effect major organizational transformations.

John Kotter’s articles in The Harvard Business Review over the past twenty years have sold more reprints than any of the hundreds of distinguished authors who have written for that publication during the same time period. His books are in the top 1% of sales from Amazon.com.

He is a graduate of MIT and Harvard. He joined the Harvard Business School faculty in 1972. In 1980, at the age of 33, he was given tenure and a full professorship.



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P Lorange and J Roos

P Lorange and J Roos are leading business school academics on Strategic Alliances Dr. Peter Lorange has been the President of IMD since July 1, 1993. He is Professor of Strategy and holds the Nestlé Chair.

Johan Roosis the Director of Swiss-based Imagination Lab Foundation (www.imagilab.org). He was previously a Professor at IMD, Norwegian School of Management and affiliated with Wharton School and Stockholm School of Economics. An entrepreneur in academia, he is a prolific writer and consultant on a wide range of general management topics, and in particular innovative strategy practices.

Lorange and Roos wrote "strategic Alliances".



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James G. March

James G. March is Professor Emeritus at Stanford University. He is best known for his research on organizations and organizational decision-making.

March is highly respected for his broad theoretical perspective, which combined theories from Psychology and other behavioural sciences.

He collaborated with the Cognitive psychologist Herbert Simon on several works on organization theory.

March is also known for his seminal work on the behavioural perspective on Theory of the firm along with Richard Cyert (1963).

In 1972, March worked together with Olsen and Cohen on the systemic-anarchic perspective of organizational decision-making known as the Garbage Can Model.



Harry Markowitz

Harry Max Markowitz (born August 24, 1927) is an influential economist at the Rady School of Management at the University of California, San Diego. He is best known for his pioneering work in modern portfolio theory, studying the effects of asset risk, correlation and diversification on expected investment portfolio returns.



Robert C. Merton

Robert C. Merton Bio from Nobel prize Organisation

Robert C. Merton won the 1997 Nobel Prize together with Myron Scholes for their derivative pricing formula.

Merton was the first to publish a paper expanding our mathematical understanding of the options pricing model and coined the term "Black-Scholes" options pricing model, by enhancing work that was published by Fischer Black and Myron Scholes. Merton authored a paper entitled "The Theory of Rational Option Pricing" which was published the Bell Journal of Economics and Management Science in the spring of 1973.



McTaggart, Kontes and Mankins

James McTaggart, Peter Kontes, and Michael Mankins

James McTaggart, Peter Kontes, and Michael Mankins reveal their powerful new framework for the systematic, day-to-day management of shareholder value.

The authors attack head-on the fundamental weaknesses in current management practices, namely, the stranglehold that budgeting has over strategic

planning and the lack of imagination in management plans that prevents real changes and consequences.



lan Mitrof

Ian Mitroff is a well-known business policy professor, writer, editor, lecturer, and consultant on human-caused crises.

In 1986, Mitroff established the USC Center for Crisis Management at the University of Southern California (Los Angeles) in the Graduate School of Business. He was the director of the USC Center for ten years whose purpose was to analyze human-caused crises and create state-of-the-art tools to better manage them.

Mitroff has published over 250 papers and articles and over 25 books in 15 different fields of strategic study.

As a lecturer, Mitroff has advised and influenced various academic, corporate, and government leaders in over twenty foreign countries.



Henry Mintzberg

Henry Mintzberg and The Rise and Fall of Strategic Planning

Professor Henry Mintzberg, (born September 2, 1939) is an internationally renowned academic and author on business and strategic management.

Henry Mintzberg writes prolifically on the topics of strategic management and business strategy, with more than 140 articles and 13 books to his name.

His seminal book, The Rise and Fall of Strategic Planning, criticizes some of the practices of strategic planning today and is considered required reading for anyone who seriously wants to consider taking on a strategy-making role within their organization.

He recently published a book entitled Managers Not MBAs, which outlines what he believes to be wrong with management education today.



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Kjell A. Nordstrom

Kjell A. Nordstrom The World's Funkiest Strategy Guru

Amid the madness and hyperbole surrounding the new economy, Dr. Kjell A. Nordstrom is a guru of the new world of business.

The 2001 Thinkers 50, the world's first ranking of management thinkers, ranked Nordstrom and his partner Dr. Jonas Ridderstrale at number 17 (one place below Nicholas Negroponte and one ahead of Stephen Covey).

His dynamic style makes him a highly appreciated speaker throughout the world. He has served as an advisor/consultant to several large multinationals..



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Kenichi Ohmae

Kenichi Ohmae and The 3C's model

Kenichi Ohmae (born February 21, 1943) is one of the world's leading business and corporate strategists. He is known as Mr. Strategy and has developed the 3C's Model.

Kenichi Ohmae made his mark twenty years ago with his book on corporate strategy. It is still a collection of good sense and clear advice, even though some of the examples may now seem a bit dated.

Successful business strategies, he says in "The Mind of the Strategist", do not come from rigorous analysis but from a thought process, which is basically creative and intuitive rather than rational.

Having written what many people regarded as the bible of corporate strategy, Kenichi Ohmae moved on to the changing shape of the world of business.



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Dave Packard and Bill Hewlett (Masters)

In the early days of Hewlett-Packard (HP), Dave Packard and Bill Hewlett devised an active management style that they called Management By Walking Around (MBWA).

Senior HP managers were seldom at their desks. They spent most of their days visiting employees, customers, and suppliers. This direct contact with key people provided them with a solid grounding from which viable strategies could be crafted.

Before Palo Alto's punky garage band the Donnas, the myth of the garage was established by William Hewlett and David Packard, (Master Strategists) founding a company building electronic test and measurement equipment on $500 capital.

These two smart fellows five years out of Stanford, established Hewlett-Packard corporation and won the bid for an audio oscillator to test the sound equipment for Walt Disney's "Fantasia", and their fantasia became historia.

Their company's 1968 Hewlett-Packard 9100A was the first personal computer, but they marketed it as a "desktop calculator" so as not to evoke images of IBM. They developed the laser printer, the single unit printer/copier/scanner/FAXer, and a bunch of other stuff.

In the 1980s Iran-Iraq war, their Ohio office shipped militarily useful tech to Iraq. By 2000, a series of corporate buyouts and acquisitions made H-P the world's largest manufacturer of personal computers.

The garage myth was re-energized (and craftily exploited) by Steve Wozniak and Steve Jobs in the 1970s. In my 1991 muralized interactive kiosk "Collaborationation" I limned the myth of the garage, as applicable to my own fruitful forms of collaboration, garage bands and even community murals.



Richard Pascale and Anthony Athos

Richard Pascale and Anthony Athos In The Art of Japanese Management claimed that the main reason for Japanese success was their superior management techniques.

They divided management into 7 aspects (which are also known as McKinsey 7S Framework): Strategy, Structure, Systems, Skills, Staff, Style, and Subordinate goals (which we would now call shared values).

The first three of the 7 S's were called hard factors and this is where American companies excelled.

The remaining four factors (skills, staff, style, and shared values) were called soft factors and were not well understood by American businesses of the time (for details on the role of soft and hard factors see Wickens P.D. 1995.)

Americans did not yet place great value on corporate culture, shared values and beliefs, and social cohesion in the workplace.

In Japan, the task of management was seen as managing the whole complex of human needs, economic, social, psychological, and spiritual.



Jeffrey Pfeffer

Jeffrey Pfeffer is the Thomas D. Dee II Professor of Organizational Behaviour in the Graduate School of Business at Stanford University, where he has taught since 1979.

He is the author or co-author of twelve books including the External Control of Organizations: A Resource Dependence Perspective (translated in Japanese).



Nigel Piercy

Nigel Piercy is known for stakeholder analysis. He was a professor of marketing at Cardiff University. He is now a professor of marketing at Cranfield school of management.

Nigel Says: Marketing has lost its way! In country after country, senior executives have become obsessed with making their companies more customer-focused, market-focused, outward-oriented, or some permutation of those qualities -- often to no avail.

Companies cannot win in today's competitive markets by delegating marketing problems to a department.

Success in the new marketplace demands integration of the firm's entire set of capabilities into a seamless system with the goal of exemplary customer satisfaction. I

n an era of total competition, commitment to customers must also be total -- hence, the title of our book. We want you to rethink your company's entire approach to the marketplace. Nothing less will ensure your success in the markets of tomorrow.



Michael E Porter

Michael E Porter's 5 forces analysis

Michael Porter is an American academic focused on strategic management and economics.

Professor Michael Porter's ideas on strategy are the foundation for modern strategy courses, and his work is taught at the Harvard Business School and at virtually every business school in the world.

Professor Porter’s current course at Harvard is a University-wide graduate course, Microeconomics of Competitiveness, which is also taught in partnership with more than 65 other universities from every continent using curriculum, video content and instructor support developed at the Institute.



Tom Peters

Tom Peters The World's Leading Management Guru

Tom Peters (born November 7, 1942) is an American writer and expert on business, leadership and strategic management practices, best-known for co-writing the classic book, In Search of Excellence, with Robert H. Waterman, Jr.

His first book, In Search of Excellence, co-written with Bob Waterman, launched a management revolution and was ranked in a recent poll carried out by Bloomsbury Press as the "greatest business book of all time".

Since then, he has remained at the forefront of the movement to radically change organisations and how they are led in the face of new consumer, global and technological realities.

Tom, meanwhile, describes himself as "a prince of disorder, champion of bold failures, maestro of zest, professional loudmouth, corporate cheerleader, lover of markets and... capitalist pig."



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J B Quinn

Quinn is a major thinker within the process school of strategy. He is well known for explaining how strategic decisions typically evolve in a part random, or erratic, and part logical. He coined the expression"logical incrementalism".

Quinn explained how strategic decisions typically evolve in a part random or erratic and part logical way. Quinn coined the term logical incrementalism to capture this idea. Clearly strategic decisions had some logic to them, otherwise strategic action would be foolish.

Whilst being influenced significantly by Braybrooke and Lindblom, Quinn incorporated within his theory of strategic decisions both random and logical elements.

Quinn's view was that managers tended to make strategic decisions according to perceptions of incremental opportunities that appeared to add to what they already had. Partly driven by their business legacy and pertly by the change and incremental profit top managers were attracted to piecemeal strategies.



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Robert B. Reich

Robert B. Reich is Professor of Public Policy at the Goldman School of Public Policy at the University of California at Berkeley. He has served in three national administrations, most recently as secretary of labour under President Bill Clinton. He has written eleven books, including The Work of Nations, which has been

translated into 22 languages; the best-sellers The Future of Success and Locked in the Cabinet, and his most recent book, Super capitalism. His articles have appeared in the New Yorker, Atlantic Monthly, New York Times, Washington Post, and Wall Street Journal.

Mr. Reich is co-founding editor of The American Prospect magazine. His weekly commentaries on public radio’s "Marketplace" are heard by nearly five million people.

In 2003, Reich was awarded the prestigious Vaclev Havel Foundation Prize, by the former Czech president, for his pioneering work in economic and social thought. In 2005, his play, Public Exposure, broke box office records at its world premiere on Cape Cod.



Al Ries and Jack Trout (Masters)

Al Ries and Jack Trout on Positioning

Although the theory of Positioning originated with Jack Trout in 1969, it didn’t gain wide acceptance until Al Ries and Jack Trout wrote their classic book “Positioning: The Battle For Your Mind” (1979).

A product's position is how potential buyers see the product. Positioning is expressed relative to the position of competitors. The term was coined in 1969 by Al Ries and Jack Trout in the paper "Positioning" is a game people play in today’s me-too market place" in the publication Industrial Marketing. It was then expanded into their ground-breaking first book, "Positioning: The Battle for Your Mind".



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Ed Schein

Ed Schein was educated at the University of Chicago, at Stanford University where he received a Masters Degree in Psychology in 1949, and at Harvard University where he received his Ph.D. in social psychology in 1952.

He was Chief of the Social Psychology Section of the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research while serving in the U.S. Army as Captain from 1952 to 1956. He joined MIT's Sloan School of Management in 1956 and was made a Professor of Organizational Psychology and Management in 1964.

From 1968 to 1971, Schein was the Undergraduate Planning Professor for MIT, and in 1972, he became the Chairman of the Organization Studies Group of the MIT Sloan School, a position he held until 1982. He was honoured in 1978 when he was named the Sloan Fellows Professor of Management, a Chair he held until 1990.

At the present, he is Sloan Fellows Professor of Management Emeritus and continues at the Sloan School part time as a Senior Lecturer. He is also the Founding Editor of "Reflections" the Journal of the Society for Organizational Learning devoted to connecting academics, consultants, and practitioners around the issues of knowledge creation, dissemination and utilization.

Schein has been a prolific researcher, writer, teacher and consultant. Besides his numerous articles in professional journals he has authored fourteen books including Organizational Psychology (3d edit., 1980), Career Dynamics (1978), Organizational Culture and Leadership (1985, 1992, 2004), and Process Consultation Vol. 1 and Vol. 2 (1969, 1987, 1988), Process Consultation Revisited (1999), and The Corporate Culture Survival Guide (1999).



Myron Samuel Scholes

Myron Samuel Scholes (born July 1, 1941 in Timmins, Ontario, Canada) is one of the authors of the famous Black-Scholes equation.

In 1997, he was awarded the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics for "a new method to determine the value of derivatives". The model provides the fundamental conceptual framework for valuing options, such as calls or puts, and is referred to as the Black-Scholes model, which has become the standard in financial markets globally.

Trillions of dollars of options trades are executed each year using this model and derivations thereof. All binomial option models have evolved from this original concept.



Philip Selznick

Philip Selznick (1919) is professor emeritus of law and society at the University of California, Berkeley.

A noted author in organizational theory, law and society and public administration.

Selznick also introduced the idea of matching the organization's internal factors with external environmental circumstances.

This core idea was developed into what we now call SWOT analysis by Learned, Andrews, and others at the Harvard Business School General Management Group.

Strengths and weaknesses of the firm are assessed in light of the opportunities and threats from the business environment.



Peter Senge

Peter Michael Senge (1947) is an American scientist and director of the Center for Organizational Learning at the MIT Sloan School of Management. He is

known as author of the book The Fifth Discipline: The art and practice of the learning organization from 1990.

An engineer by training, Peter was a protégé' of Jay Wright Forrester and has followed closely the works of Chris Argyris and Robert Fritz and based his books on pioneering works with the five disciplines in Ford, Chrysler, Shell, AT&T, Hannover Insurance, Harley-Davidson since the 70s and 80s through today.

Senge emerged in the 1990s as a major figure in organizational development with his book The Fifth Discipline where he developed the notion of a learning organization. This views organizations as dynamical systems (as defined in Systemics) in a state of continuous adaptation and improvement .



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Alvin Toffler

Alvin Toffler (born October 3, 1928) is an American writer and futurist, known for his works discussing the digital revolution, communications revolution, corporate revolution and technological singularity. A former associate editor of Fortune magazine, his early work focused on technology and its impact (through effects like information overload).

In 1970, Alvin Toffler in Future Shock described a trend towards accelerating rates of change.

He illustrated how social and technological norms had shorter lifespan with each generation, and he questioned society's ability to cope with the resulting turmoil and anxiety.



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David Ulrich

Dave Ulrich is a Partner and co-founder of The RBL Group and a professor of business at the Ross School of Business, University of Michigan.

Professionally, he studies how organizations build capabilities of speed, learning, collaboration, accountability, talent, and leadership through leveraging human capital.

He has helped generate multiple award winning data bases that assess alignment between strategies, human resource practices and HR competencies.




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Hal Varian

Dean of the School of Information Management & Systems at the University of California at Berkeley, and author of Information Rules: A Strategic Guide to the Network Economy. Currently on leave from Berkeley and serving as Chief Economist at Google.

Varian's assertion that "Technology changes. Economic laws do not." introduces a series of efforts in applying general economic principles to the information economy.



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Sam Walton (Master)

Samuel Moore Walton (March 29, 1918 – April 6, 1992), born in Kingfisher, Oklahoma was the founder of two American retailers Wal-Mart and Sam's Club. He was the patriarch of the Walton family, one of the richest families in the world.

The first true Wal-Mart opened in 1962 in Bentonville, Arkansas. Wal-Mart eventually became the world's largest retailer.

Walton stated, "Each Wal-Mart store should reflect the values of its customers and support the vision they hold for their community."

Wal-Mart has outreach programs led by local associates who grew up in the area and understand its needs. Wal-Mart becomes involved in local communities by allowing local charities to hold bake sales on store property, and by offering scholarships to graduating seniors from local high schools.



Thomas John Watson, Jr. (Master)

Thomas John Watson, Jr. (January 14, 1914 – December 31, 1993) was the president of IBM from 1952 to 1971 and the eldest son of Thomas J. Watson, IBM's first president. He was listed as one of TIME Magazine's 100 most influential people of the 20th century.



Jack Welch (Master)

Jack Welch, Jr. (born November 19, 1935) was Chairman and CEO of General Electric between 1981 and 2001.

Welch gained a solid reputation for uncanny business acumen and unique leadership strategies at GE. During his tenure, GE increased its market capitalization by over $400 billion.

He remains a highly-regarded figure in business circles due to his innovative management strategies and leadership style.



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Marvin Zonis

Marvin Zonis Leading Academic & Global Political Economist

Marvin Zonis is a Professor at the Graduate School of Business at the University of Chicago.



Shoshana Zuboff

Shoshana Zuboff is the Charles Edward Wilson Professor of Business Administration at the Harvard Business School (retired).

She was born in 1951 [place unknown] and is an American citizen. One of the first tenured women at the Harvard Business School, she earned her Ph.D. in social psychology from Harvard University and her B.A. in philosophy from the University of Chicago.

Author of the celebrated classic In the Age of the Smart Machine: The Future of Work and Power (1988).

This book won instant critical acclaim in both the academic and trade press—including the front page review in the New York Times Book Review-- and is now considered the definitive study of information technology in the workplace.

Of particular interest, this book introduced the concept of Informating, the process that translates descriptions and measurements of activities, events and objects into information. By doing so, these activities become visible to the organization at all levels. As a result, Informating has both an empowering and oppressing influence.


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